Newest San Marcos Mural Celebrates Indigenous Cultures

The City of San Marcos unveiled a new mural at City Hall that depicts the origin of the native indigenous community here in San Marcos. The five animals displayed in the mural represent the Coahuiltecas’ spirit animals and interpret how they came to be. 

 Following an application process, muralist Ernesto Hernandez was chosen to complete the art that can be seen on a building at City Hall, 630 E Hopkins St. Hernandez has more than 28 years working on murals and has worked with Indigenous Cultures Institute (ICI), a local organization dedicated to the indigenous community, where he got wind of the potential project. 

 “I worked with ICI as an instructor and muralist,” said Hernandez. “That is how I learned that Trey from the City was accepting applications, and I thought to myself I have to be a part of this project.” 

 The mural consists of the five Coahuiltecas spirit animals: a deer, water bird, jaguar, wolf, and eagle. Using vibrant colors, the mural depicts water as the root of everything because everything comes from water. 

 “The two lines represent water,” said Hernandez. “Their belief is that they originated from the natural water source here in San Marcos.”

 Hernandez prides himself as a muralist who loves to learn. He says murals play an important role in our community. 

 “People speak about feeling seen and included,” said Hernandez. “That’s what murals do. They are democratic in that way.”

 Hernandez identifies as indigenous and said this project was particularly special to him. 

“I felt connected to this mural,” said Hernandez. “A lot of this history is not taught in schools, and when you negate the history of a people that lived in an area, you’re not living the reality of where you are.” 

 The City’s Convention and Visitor Bureau played a significant role in the artist search. They wanted to make sure they picked the perfect person to tell an important story in the community.  

 “It just felt right,” said Arts Coordinator Trey Hatt. “Ernesto has many years of experience working on murals and his connection to the ICI solidified our reason for picking him.”

 Hernandez did not complete the mural by himself. He had a few helping hands from his family making this a communal project. 

 “It was about 19 of us out there, I even had the little kids helping,” said Hernandez. “When they grow up the mural will still be there, and they can have a sense of pride that they helped with creating it.”

 The mural took about seven weeks to complete, with Hernandez working primarily in the evening on the weekends. 

 “Trey and the whole City really worked with me and allowed for me to create my own schedule,” said Hernandez. “I really appreciated that.”

 The City encourages members of the community to stop by the mural and enjoy the artwork.

 

 

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